Kawasaki S1-S3

 

 

Kawasaki S3 400

 

 

 

Make Model

Kawasaki S3 400

Year 1974-75
Engine Air cooled, two stroke, transverse three cylinder,
Capacity 400
Bore x Stroke 57 x 52.3 mm
Compression Ratio 6,5:1
Induction 3x Mikuni VM26SC, Ø 26 mm carbs
Ignition / Starting Battery and coil  /  kick
Max Power 42 ch @ 7000 rpm
Max Torque 4.32 m-kg @ 6500rpm
Transmission/Drive 5 Speed  /  chain
Frame Double tubular steel cradle
Front Suspension Telescopic Hydraulic forks
Rear Suspension Dual shocks, Swing arm
Front Brakes Single 277mm disc
Rear Brakes 180mm Drum
Front Tyre 3.25 -18
Rear Tyre 3.50 -18
Dry-Weight 160 kg
Fuel Capacity  14 Litres

In 1974, the 400 S3 replaces the 350 S2. Upon arrival, the 400 S3 also replaces the 350 S2 cuts in Kawasaki. This machine is not obtained by a simple réalésage engine, but the purpose of deep reflection.

With the 400, Kawasaki did not seek the maximum power. Despite an engine capacity above and carburetors largest (from 24 to 26 mm in diameter, the power falls to 42 hp, but it is obtained 1000 rpm lower. This is the couple that benefits of increased displacement, it rose from 4.00 to 4.32 mkg mkg, but as power, it is obtained 1000 rpm lower. Kawasaki's efforts have made the 400 S3 exploitable that 350 S2. Engaging benefits a disk and pump oil is also reviewed.

The chassis has also been a trend to provide greater stability through increased hunting and the wheelbase.

Towards comfort, the engine is mounted in part through silentblocs. The machine is therefore less sensitive to vibration. The general line, even if the machine is always easily identifiable thanks to the 3 exhaust systems, is now much more classic.

In 1975, Kawasaki S3A markets. The changes are primarily aesthetic.

1975 also lacks the end of the career of this medium-size machine. In 1976, a victim of the oil crisis, it is replaced by the 400 KH.

 

 

1974 Kawasaki S3 MACH 2 in Green

 

  • 400 cc
  • 2-Stroke, 3 Cylinder
  • Piston Valve
  • S-Speed Return Shift
  • Maximum Horsepower:
  • 42 HP @ 7,000 rpm
  • Spark Plug: NGK B9HS
  • Tire Size
  • Front: 3.25s-18 4PR
  • Rear: 3.50s-18 4PR
  • Color
  • Fuel Tank: Candy Red, Candy Sky Blue
  • Front Fender: Chrome
  • Engine No.: S3E00001-
  • Frame No.: S3F-00001-
  • Parts Catalogue No. : 99997-624, (E) 99997-624-01S
  • Owner's Manual No. : 99997-812, (E) 99983-019, (F) 99983-031, (I) 99983-032, (W) 99983-033
  • Shop Manual No.: 99997-705
  • Remarks: Developed version of the 350 cc Kawasaki S2. Rubber bushings are adopted to absorb the vibration. The cylinder head fins differ from S2's.

 

1975 Kawasaki S3A

 

  • Color
  • Fuel Tank: Candy Super Red, Candy Green
  • Front Fender: Chrome
  • Engine No.: S3E 14300-
  • Frame No.: S3F-14300-
  • Parts Catalogue No.: 99997-624-50S, (E) 99997-624-51S
  • Owner's Manual No.: 99997-846
  • Shop Manual No.: 99997-705
  • Major Changes: Color and marking.

 

 

Kawasaki KH400 restoration

 

 

KH400 before restorationBy Mal King, Bandicoot Trailers

In 2009 I purchased a Kawasaki S2 350cc triple. Not long after, while skimming through a Bike Trader magazine at the local newsagent (as you do) , I happened upon an ad for another Kawasaki two stroke triple. This one was the later KH400, supposedly a much nicer bike to ride than the S2. I expect you know what happened next.

 

Dont they always look good in the photos!

The bike was advertised as restore or clean up and ride as is. After seeing a couple of photos I had the bike shipped up from Victoria. Dont they always look nicer in the photos. On first inspection I found a broken throttle cable, completely gummed up carburettors and the brake fluid had turned into a crumbling solid. It had all the signs of a bike that had been parked outside in the Californian sun for a very long time, as of course had been the case. The bike, however, kicked over with good compression, just as the man had said.

 

KH400 in packing caseDecisions and a bit of a rant

So the decision to restore the bike was made there and then. An engineering background and some admitted love/hate relationships working on mostly Italian bikes further boosted morale.

I remember one particular Italian bike where it was necessary to remove the swing arm to be able to drop the battery out to top up the fluid. Give me a break! The manual advised lifting out the battery from above; pity about the frame strengthening gusset running across the top. I took the opportunity to cut an inspection aperture in the said gusset. Handling remained just as crisp by the way. Surely the Kawasaki wouldnt have any similar tricks up its sleeve? It did put up a bit of a fight as I tried to remove the air box and battery carrier, but otherwise was straightforward enough to work on.
 

Words of wisdom

A good basis for a rebuild is all rather obvious really: buy the best condition bike you can afford with as much of the original kit intact. For example to replace the exhaust system on a triple is going to be very expensive, thats if you can find one. If you fit after market pipes you have all but destroyed the originality and character of the bike.
 

The start

Not generally known for my patience, I surprised myself by taking lots of detailed photographs BEFORE the strip down. I also had a similar bike for reference, so although it was my first resto I felt reasonably confident I could see the job through.

I parked the bike in an out of the way corner to start the strip down. I had already decided to be quite methodical in my approach, again surprising myself and buying a stack of storage bins and a large note book. I took a photograph of every part as it was removed and logged down in the book every screw type, length, head type, plain washer under head etc, etc. I then stored the part in a relevant bin ready for the next stage, a good clean up, replate, replace, that sort of thing.


Bike before stripdown 1 Bike before stripdown Bike before stripdown Bike before stripdown

 

No turning back

I stripped the bike down in what seemed a logical order, remove tank, side panels and tail unit. With the paintwork out of the way I removed the wiring loom, taking note of the various cable runs especially, which way the main loom wraps around the frame. I got that wrong in one place on the rebuild, it took a good while to correct. I then removed the ancillary parts and remembered struggling to remove the air box and battery carrier. Bit of a catch 22 really. Needed to remove the air box to get to the battery carrier, but needed to remove the battery carrier...

A mate helped to lift the engine from the frame as per workshop manual. A milk crate came in useful to support the engine. It is a good idea to have a storage place in mind first, especially so with a heavier engine; the triple engine luckily is quite light. Remove wheels, drive out swing arm bolt, remove fork stanchions and yokes, you're done.

It is a good idea at this stage to sit down and have a cup of tea (being a pom) or a beer, to consider the next stage. The big thing that kept coming back at me was to work in a methodical manner, take your time and try to enjoy it. It's easy just to pull a bike to pieces and leave a pile of oily bits on the floor! I separated all the parts into storage bins, powder coat, replate, restore and so on.
 

A sense of order

I prepared the parts for the various refinishing processes based on lead times, chrome plating seems to take a while, powder coating seems to happen quite quickly. Not having any trade contacts I went purely on recommendations on which people to use. Club membership comes in handy at this stage, especially if like me you are new to an area.
 

More decisions and oh dear

It is worth mentioning I chose powder coating for the frame and some ancillary parts based on cost and durability. I know a lot of folks prefer a more original paint finish.

I had decided not to be too precious over originality and went for a durable finish and what I thought some useful upgrades on the rebuild. You certainly learn were the factory cut costs and what can easily be improved upon with modern processes and parts on a project like this. Overall, I did not stray far from the original and just went for tapered head race bearings, braided brake lines, more modern radial appearance tyres, stainless wheel steel spokes, you get the idea.

Back to powder coating. You need to be prepared to take some time in identifying areas that do not need powder coating, as it is quite a thick coat and very hard, read hard to remove. (There are books written on the subject). Likewise be prepared to clean out threads and earthing points on getting the powder coated parts back.

In my particular case I spent some time talking to the powder coater, himself a biker and used to coating bike projects. He assured me he would mask ALL relevant parts with the special high temp tape. I have to say in spite of this when I received the parts back, although an excellent job, i.e. nice and shiny, uniform finish, this also included INSIDE the fork stanchions and master cylinder. I was very lucky to find a specialist who could remove this, AT a price of course, please be warned.
 

Getting into it now

With all the various parts listed (I kept copies for my own reference) and sent off to the specialists for refinishing it was time to take stock and make out yet another list of parts that were beyond redemption or missing for replacement. Where ever possible I tried to obtain NOS (new old stock parts.) This is when you are pleased you chose a model with good vintage spares back up. I went through a learning curve but am pretty sure I know most of the main players in the supply of vintage Kawasaki parts, both new and used. Amazing how much new old stock is still listed and available from Kawasaki themselves by the way.
 

More work but worth doing

It is probably worth mentioning at this time that I cleaned the parts as best I could before sending off for refinishing. Not too many people want their chroming vats contaminated with two stroke exhausts, they will also charge accordingly for any pre-treatments.
 

Cleaning the parts I could reuse

Time to get mucky again; old clothes and plenty of degreaser. I used a plastic washing up bowl set up at camping stool height to save grovelling on the deck, or more correctly to obtain a useful working height. A pair of glasses for eye protection, rubber gloves ditto for hands and got stuck in. I did most of this outside in the Queensland sunshine.

ignition coilsI started off cleaning the control cables, for no particular reason other than you have to start somewhere. These came up remarkably well, as did the wiring loom. I hung all these up (vertically) on nails tapped into the woodwork around the garage. This kept them out of the way and took up the least amount of room and I was able to run some lubricating oil through the cables as well. I could then put a tick against these as ready for re-assembly.

  As I went through the pile of parts I started to continue the theme and hung as many parts up on the garage walls as I could. Other parts I simply placed into a rack of storage bins.

With everything cleaned up as best I could I decided to repaint certain parts. This included the metal ferrules on the ends of the control cables. The end result was pleasing and saved a few dollars, well quite a few actually on buying new cables. I even managed to get the broken throttle inner cable repaired. Actually a new cable would have been cheaper!

New nuts & bolts

With all the bits of bike either away at the finishers or hanging on the garage walls or cleaned and repainted and waiting in storage bins I had time to consider my next move.

nuts and boltsI chose to take my list of replacement nuts bolts and washers to the local stockist. In my case everything was very sensibly (thanks Kawasaki) in metric threads. Mostly metric Coarse threads, but some metric Fine. I chose to use nyloc self locking nuts in place of spring washers and plain nuts were possible. Sometimes it works; sometimes the physical size is too large. You just have to make a judgement call on what looks right.
 

Switch gear

I chose this time to have a look inside the switchgear housings. More digital pics and a spot of penetrating goo on the various fixings. I found it best to really take my time and not rush this part especially. The fixing are quite small M2 and M2.5. I also took note of the various insulating washers under the heads of some screws. I took the precaution of laying out a large piece of rag to work on just in case any of the small parts tried to go AWOL.


switch housingAfter a good clean up and check of all the various conducting surfaces it was time for careful re-assembly. In my particular case I had sent off the switch housings with the rest of the parts for powder coating. Of course when these parts come back all the markings are powder coated over too. I spent a good while with an artists brush and pots of white and yellow enamel refilling the original engravings.
 

More decisions and send bits off

Well, I seemed to be getting on okay. More mental notes Note 1: engine still sits on milk crate. Did I order a gasket set? Note 2: Speedo and rev counter dials faded by years of sunlight. Order new dial faces as this can badly upset the overall effect of any restoration, have seen it many times. Bike looks like new; the dials really shout back at you, Im at least thirty years old. Note 3: Same goes for paintwork, tank side panels and tailpiece all faded paint. Choose colour and order correct decal set. Have I forgotten anything? Well of course I have; just wont find out what till later!
 

new dialsDouble check

What to do next? Made sure all the parts I needed were on order: check. All parts for refinishing out there: check. All other parts, cleaned, repainted and ready to go back on the bike: check.
 

Engine & Carburettors

Right, it was then time to have a look-see at the motor. I had prised out the rubber engine mounts earlier and although they appeared to be in very good condition I would have replaced them as a matter of course, but was unable to source any new ones. So I lubed the old ones with just like new rubber enhancer ready for reassemble.

The motor appeared in good condition externally so I just blocked off the important little places and gave it a degrease and hose down. Next I removed the carburettors. They were completely gummed up but easily stripped and cleaned with the help of some proprietary carb cleaner and a good brush for the outside castings.

The engine had good compression so I limited the work to just removing the cylinder heads for a check inside. The engine internals looked to be in excellent condition with no lip on the barrels etc. and generally very clean. This is an advantage with buying a bike with low verified miles I guess, shouldnt be too much wear and tear. The heads I masked up and took to a local shop for a very light sand blast.

I replaced the heads, happy that I had ordered the new gasket set and masked and sprayed the barrel and heads with high temp aluminium finish paint. Once I had hand polished the engine casings I was quite satisfied with the overall effect. Replaced the carbs and called it job done.

KH400 engine ready to go backIt may sound odd but I was not overly worried about the engine. I just treated it as a unit I can work on if necessary another time.

My rationale for this went something along these lines. As long as these Kawasaki two strokes have compression and a spark it is hard for them not to go. They are of a very simple, read easy to work on, piston port design. They are also very robust. If you do need spares they are cheap and plentiful. Oh and the sound of a two stroke triple is like no other!

I knew now that I could remove the engine unit in around twenty minutes. If ever I do need to then that is the time I will get the engine bead blasted and refinished professionally.
 

On the home straight

Next was the good part, as all the new and refinished parts started to arrive. I spent the best part of a day checking that I had all the parts back from the powder coaters and started to clear all the threads, earthing points and the like for unwanted powder coat. It was quite difficult to remove some of the baked on masking material. But the job got done; they really had done an excellent job. I just had one piece missing which they could not find. So I found a local machinist to make up a new chain adjuster block from the pattern I already had. Although only a small cost in itself, they do all start to add up.


powder coated parts 1 powder coated parts 2
 

Thought things were going too well!

Rather more disappointing was the powder coat on the inside of the fork stanchions and brake master cylinder. I count myself fortunate to have found somebody skilled enough and with the right equipment to hone the parts clear of powder coat. Now what was I saying about all the small costs adding up? I had the forks and brake calliper rebuilt by the same people so I got them back all ready to fit on the bike, which was nice.
 

Swing arm in frameThe rebuild

I started the rebuild proper by first fitting the swing arm; I had already pressed in the new steel bushes. Armed with digital photos I carefully inserted the freshly greased swing arm bolt from the correct side and slid on the plain washer and new nyloc nut. I did not fully tighten anything fully at this stage, but just nipped things up. 

 

So thats what it looked like

Same process to fit the steering stem with the new tapered bearings, followed by the fork legs themselves. Now seemed like the right time to fit the wheels back into the frame. It started to look like a bike now. I really was taking my time now and making sure everything went back correctly and easily without using undue force on anything.

Next I fitted the battery holder and air box followed by the rear wheel guard. I decided to fit the engine back in at this stage. I placed all the lightly greased engine bolts out in order, and laid some rag on the frame to look after the fresh powder coat. A mate helped me offer the engine up into the frame while my wife slipped in a couple of engine bolts. It really was that easy with the light weight of the Kawasaki engine. I tightened everything to the correct torque with the steering head bearings adjusted in the time-honoured fashion.
 

Easily done?

After fitting the headlight shell it was time to install the wiring loom. I just loosely cable tied it in place at this stage. I did manage to get it the wrong way round one of the frame tubes, even with the photos. Save to say I got a bit angry with myself at this point as it took quite a while to feed it back through without straining the cabling. I was determined not to do any disassembling at this stage, so struggled on.

Now it was just a case of fitting all the rest of the ancillary components back in a rational order, so I will not labour this stage. Once everything was back in the right places I fully connected the wiring loom and tensioned the securing cable ties.

It really did look like a Kawasaki now. I connected up all the control cables and checked the cable runs and roughly adjusted the carburettors and clutch while still easy to get to.
 

Happy days

On the home run now. Time to bolt on the newly chromed exhaust system. How good did that look? All I needed now was the new paintwork.
This got a bit frustrating, as I still had to wait another few weeks although I had got it to the painter in plenty of time. I eventually got it back and what a superb job, I just could not fault it. A couple of hours later it was on the bike and I fitted the original Californian number plate to complete the job.


finished bike finished bike finished bike finished bike
 

Devils in the detail

Of course it was not really finished as I had to check all the fixings were tightened up to the correct torque, all the circlips, clips etc. were all fitted correctly, adjusted drive chain and rear brake and so on and probably lots more things to discover still needed some TLC.

As I was lucky enough to have another triple to ride I decided to leave this one in a dry stored state for a while at least, so resisted the temptation to add fuel and oil and swing on the kick-start.

Just in case Ive made it all sound like plain sailing I can assure you I had the customary grazed knuckles and several temper tantrums, dummy spits and is it all worth its along the way. Also I had some amusing moments when you just have to laugh at yourself for being so stupid. Overall though, it was immensely satisfying.
 

Time to contemplate

Has it all been worth while? In pure dollar terms probably not. But if you want one of these bikes in restored condition, you just have to bite the bullet. I can see why the professional restorers prices may seem so high; they have to take into account their time, I didnt.

I have listed most of my costs but inevitably some get by you, as does all the running around incurred along the way. However I do have actual costs rather than some of the folklore you may hear from time to time.

In terms of keeping a little bit of two stroke triple history going it was most definitely worthwhile. I have to say that if I had been waiting on this bike to be finished so I had something to ride it would have NOT been half as enjoyable as it turned out to be.

Keep it upright (especially after all that work)
Mal


Finished KH400

 

 

 

 
 

Kawasaki s2 350

 

 

 

Make Model Kawasaki S2 350
Year 1971
Engine Air cooled, two stroke, transverse three cylinder,
Capacity 346
Bore x Stroke 53 x 52.3 mm
Compression Ratio 7,3:1
Induction 3x Mikuni VM24SC, Ø 24 mm carbs
Ignition  /  Starting Battery and coil  /  kick
Max Power 45 hp @ 8000 rpm
Max Torque 30.7 lb-ft @ 7000 rpm
Transmission /Drive 5 Speed  /  chain
Front Suspension Telescopic Hydraulic forks
Rear Suspension Dual shocks, Swing arm
Front Brakes 180mm Drum
Rear Brakes 180mm Drum
Front Tyre 3.00 -18
Rear Tyre 3.50 -18
Dry-Weight 149.5 kg
Fuel Capacity  15 Litres
Review Bikerenews.com

After the success of Honda it was not so easy in the late sixties for a new Japanese marquee to create an image of itself. Kawasaki, however, succeeded brilliantly in establishing a reputation as an exclusive specialist in sporting motorcycles. It hung on to its reputation in racing, even though its range is considerably larger nowadays.

Bone Splintering Acceleration

It all began in 1969 when Kawasaki introduced the 500 H1, a three cylinder machine with terrifying acceleration that gave a new dimension to the concept of sporting bikes. Then Kawasaki's French importer, Xavier Maugendre, had the vision to form the Kawa-Godier endurance racing team, which finished first and second in the 1974 Bol d'Or and went one better in 1975 event by coming in 1-2-3.

One Make Formula

In 1971, Maugendre, a dyed in the wool racing enthusiast, inaugurated the "Coupe Kawasaki-Moto Revue", a one make formula that would be copied all over Europe. Initially, the Coupe Kawasaki was based on the 350cc Avenger twin but enjoyed its greatest success from 1972 on, when the formula centered on the three cylinder 350 S2. this was derived from the famous 500 H1, probably the most explosive motorcycle of its era, and - though it performed better on a circuit than on the road - the S2 was a little more civilized than the H1.

 

General Specifications
Make Kawasaki Model S2 350
Year 1973 Engine Air cooled, two stroke, transverse three cylinder,
Displacement CC 346.00
Type Standard Displacement Cubic Inches 21.11
Front Suspension Telescopic Hydraulic forks Rear Suspension Dual shocks, Swing arm
Electrical
Ignition Battery and coil
Engine and Components
Engine Air cooled, two stroke, transverse three cylinder, Cubic Centimeters 346
Cubic Inches 21.1142154586 Bore and Stroke 53 x 52.3 mm
Compression Ratio 7,3:1 Induction 3x Mikuni VM24SC, Ø 24 mm carbs
Drivetrain
Transmission 5 Speed
Final Drive chain
Wheels and Tires
Front Tire 3.00 -18 Rear Tire 3.50 -18
Weights and Measures
Dry Weight LBS 329.59 Dry Weight KG 149.47
Fuel Capacity US Gallons 3.9 Fuel Capacity Litre 14.76
Performance
Maximum Horsepower 45 hp @ 8000 rpm Maximum Torque 30.7 lb-ft @ 7000 rpm


Year Title Picture Description
1971 1971-72 kawasaki s2 350 72 kawasaki s2 350 1971

Air cooled, two stroke, transverse three cylinder 45bhp @ 8000rpm 5 speed drum brakes 149.5kg

1972 Kawasaki S2A 1972 Kawasaki S2A  
1973 1973 kawasaki s2 350 kawasaki s2 350 1973

Air cooled, two stroke, transverse three cylinder.

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1973 Kawasaki S2A 1973 Kawasaki S2A  
1973 1973 Kawasaki S2a 350 1973 Kawasaki S2a 350  

 

1972 Kawasaki 350 S2

 


In 1974, the Kawasaki S2 was upgraded to 400 cc
and its designation was changed to S3

After the success of Honda it was not so easy in the late sixties for a new Japanese marquee to create an image of itself. Kawasaki, however, succeeded brilliantly in establishing a reputation as an exclusive specialist in sporting motorcycles. It hung on to its reputation in racing, even though its range is considerably larger nowadays.

Bone Splintering Acceleration

It all began in 1969 when Kawasaki introduced the 500 H1, a three cylinder machine with terrifying acceleration that gave a new dimension to the concept of sporting bikes. Then Kawasaki's French importer, Xavier Maugendre, had the vision to form the Kawa-Godier endurance racing team, which finished first and second in the 1974 Bol d'Or and went one better in 1975 event by coming in 1-2-3.

One Make Formula

In 1971, Maugendre, a dyed in the wool racing enthusiast, inaugurated the "Coupe Kawasaki-Moto Revue", a one make formula that would be copied all over Europe. Initially, the Coupe Kawasaki was based on the 350cc Avenger twin but enjoyed its greatest success from 1972 on, when the formula centered on the three cylinder 350 S2. this was derived from the famous 500 H1, probably the most explosive motorcycle of its era, and - though it performed better on a circuit than on the road - the S2 was a little more civilized than the H1.

Specifications

Engine 346cc (53 X 52.3mm) three-cylinder two stroke
Power Output44 hp @ 8000 rpm
Fuel System triple carburetors
Transmission 5 speed gearbox; chain final drive
Suspension(front) telescopic forks; (rear) swing arm
Brakes (front) twin leading shoe drum; (rear) drum
Wheels wire (front) 18in; (rear) 17in.
Weight335 lb
Maximum Speed 106 mph

 

 

Kawasaki S1 250

 

 

 

 

Manufacturer Kawasaki
Parent company Kawasaki Heavy Industries
Production 1972-1975
Predecessor Kawasaki A1 Samurai
Successor Kawasaki KH250
Class Standard
Engine 346 cc Air-cooled 3-cylinder, two-stroke, rotary valve
Top speed 152-154 km/h (95-96 mph)[citation needed]
Power 28 hp (33.5 kilowatts) @ 8000 rpm[citation needed]
Torque 30.7 lb-ft @ 7000 rpm[citation needed]
Transmission Chain driven 5-speed, 1 down-4 up pattern
Suspension Inner spring telescopic front fork, three-position spring preload adjustable shock absorber and swing arm (rear)
Weight 149.5 kg (330 lb)[citation needed] (dry)
160 kg (350 lb)[citation needed] (wet)
Fuel capacity 15 liters (3.96 gallons)
Related Kawasaki S2 Mach II, Kawasaki H1 Mach III, Kawasaki H2 Mach IV

Almost 1 year after the 350 s2, kawasaki sells the 250 s1 on french soil in may 1972. this model breaks with the previous generation, the samurai 250 at any point of view: mainly on aesthetic engine. indeed, the line of the machine is modern (it includes the lines of the 350 s2 and the 750 h2) and the engine resumed its architecture machine kawasaki flagship, the 500 h1, a 3-cylinder 2-stroke . the 250 s1 shares a number of important piece with the 350 s2. they are however easily identifiable. the 250 s1 is initialiement delivered in a white robe and cylinder engine do that 6 cooling fins (against 7 for 350). the engine is virtually indestructible (designed to withstand the power of 350). if it is also rageur than those big sisters, it is perfectly manageable, even for a beginner. given the low power (32 hp instead of 45 for 350), framework and braking are widely size. the 250 also retain throughout his career his dual front brake cam (it was not until the appearance of the kh to see a disc brake).

 


 

Year

Title

Picture

Description

1972

Kawasaki S1 250 Triple

Kawasaki S1 250 Triple

 

1972

1972 kawasaki s1 250

kawasaki s1 250 1972

 

1973

1973 kawasaki s1

kawasaki s1 1973

250cc.

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1974

Kawasaki S1

1974 Kawasaki S1

Kawasaki caused a big stir when they released the three cylinder, 500cc H1 in 1969 they followed this up two years later with the 350cc S2, and today\'s featured bike, the 250cc S1.

1975

Kawasaki S1C

Kawasaki S1C

 

1975

Kawasaki S1C

Kawasaki S1C

Its a UK model imported by Gordon Pantall dealers based in Swansea.

 

 

Kawasaki KH500

 

 

 

 

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